Six strategies for busy teachers, for providing quality feedback to pupils

A ‘Sharing best practice’ post by Tom Nadin

Our aim is to provide students with feedback which leads them to reflect on and improve their work BUT how can we do this is in a way which is sustainable and without creating an excessive work load for staff?

While it is important to give appropriately detailed written feedback on key pieces of work, it is also important for teachers to consider using feedback strategies that are practical and effective, thus helping them to manage their workload.

Teachers in the Science faculty are trialling a number of these strategies:

  • Where feedback may be fairly generic such as after a test, use photocopied stickers

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  • To identify work that is correct and work that needs correcting/editing, colour code the pupils’ responses

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  • Numbered responses

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Pupils use the numbers on the feedback stickers to write in and then respond to their own ‘Even better if…’(EBI) statements from a list which the teacher has provided for the whole class, e.g.

EBI Statements:

  1. State the correct units for force, mass and acceleration.
  2. Explain why the units for acceleration are metres per second squared.
  3. Why is acceleration a vector?
  4. Explain the difference between mass and weight
  5. The force stated here is a resultant force. What does this mean?
  • Peer assessment

When it is possible and appropriate, pupils can assess another pupil’s work based on success criteria/a marking scheme that the teacher has provided. This can also build pupils’ understanding of exam marking criteria.

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  • Self-assessment

When it is possible and appropriate, pupils can assess their own work based on success criteria/a marking scheme that the teacher has provided. This can also build pupils’ understanding of exam marking criteria.

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  • “DIRT” (Directed Improvement and Response Time)

This works best when this is a planned part of a lesson and pupils are given enough time to complete it thoroughly. Teachers need to explain the importance of it.  Insist on its completion.

Periodically, give pupils enough time to go back through their book; responding to comments and catching up on work they may have missed through absence.

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